Staff Picks


December 2019 Staff Picks

Last Updated 2019/11/28

Megan’s Pick: Older Sister. Not Necessarily Related by Jenny Heijun Wills Once in a while I read a book, a really great book, that lingers with me long after I’ve closed it. As I get closer and closer to the end a sense of dread hits me because I know I’ll have to say good bye


October 2019 Staff Picks

Last Updated 2019/10/16

David’s Pick : The Big Screen: The Story of the Movies by David Thomson “This book is a love letter to a lost love, I suppose” writes Thomson near the end of this imposing and very readable history of film. It’s a good mix of straight-up history, with some deep dives into the figures for whom Thomson


August 2019 Staff Picks

Last Updated 2019/07/31

David’s Pick: Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell One of Orwell’s funniest and most visceral books, Down and Out describes, in glorious and squalid detail, some months that Orwell spent among the poor, living a precarious existence. Despite the tone of desperation throughout, it’s really very entertaining, and Orwell’s renowned clarity of


June 2019 Staff Picks

Last Updated 2019/05/30

David’s Pick: Rupture: The Crisis of Liberal Democracy by Manuel Castells This brief but dense book addresses the recent turn to the right, in some cases to the far right, in politics worldwide, with special attention given to the Trump presidency, Brexit, & recent upheaval in Spanish politics. It’s an excellent primer, very readable & thought-provoking.


April 2019 Staff Picks

Last Updated 2019/05/01

Jayme’s Pick: The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman People can see into the future; lives and deaths are predetermined at birth; magic, especially women’s magic, plays an important role. To give one’s life for one’s child, one’s lover, one’s friend or one’s god, is the highest honour. Suffering and death are an inescapable part of life,


February 2019 Staff Picks

Last Updated 2019/02/20

Brenda’s Pick: My brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante This novel introduces the full depth of friendship that develops between two young girls born in Naples, Italy: Lila and Lenù. Growing up in an evolving neighbourhood with rivalries, poverty and family conflict puts down the roots for the three novels that follow.  The Neapolitan novels give the full


December 2018 Staff Picks

Last Updated 2018/12/12

Brenda’s Pick: Land of lost borders: out of bounds on the Silk Road by Kate Harris A Canadian and multi-faceted explorer, Kate Harris, and her friend rode a section of the Silk Road on bicycles. She totally captivates with her vivid description of the journey and musing (and humorous) narrative along the way. “What if borders


October 2018 Staff Picks

Last Updated 2018/10/03

Brenda’s Pick : No baggage: a minimalist tale of love & wandering by Clara Benson I hate packing for a trip, so this book title caught my eye. It’s an engaging story/memoir involving two people who have just met…literally…on a dating site. They are at places in their lives where they’re ready to take a risk,


August 2018 Staff Picks

Last Updated 2018/08/18

David’s Pick : The Death of Homo Economicus by Peter Fleming This blistering, hilarious, & occasionally horrifying survey of the current state of capitalism & neoliberalism will make your hair stand on end. Fleming pulls no punches and amasses evidence to show how hollowed-out the world of work has become and how crushing debt is for many people


June 2018 Staff Picks

Last Updated 2018/06/08

David’s Pick: The Rub of Time by Martin Amis Amis, who touts himself as “the only hereditary novelist in the Anglophone literary corpus”, is pretty authoritative when writing about literature, even when so much of it is devoted to his adulation of Nabokov & Bellow; Amis on politics and culture can be irritating, but the quality of the writing